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Holiness

We believe that holiness is God's prescribed standard of living for His people of all ages (Leviticus 19:2; Luke 1:74, 75). We further believe that a wholly sanctified life is the only true standard of a Christian life (Hebrews 12:14; I Peter 1:15-17). We must present ourselves Holy unto God (Romans 12:1), cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit (II

Corinthians 7:1), and separate ourselves from all worldliness (James 4:4).  No one can live holy by his own power, "But ye shall receive power, after the Holy Ghost is come upon you . . . (Acts1:8)."


New Birth

Just as the natural birth consists of the contribution of two parents -- the father begets and the mother conceives, so is the spiritual birth.  It consists of two elements coming from two spiritual parents -- Jesus Christ the father begets by the Word (I Corinthians 4:15) and the Church is the mother which conceives and brings forth the child of God.  The New Birth consists of repentance, water baptism by immersion, in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and receiving the Holy Ghost with the initial evidence of speaking in other tongues as the Spirit of God gives utterance (Acts 2:1-41; 4:12; 8:5-40; 10:44-48; 19:1-7).


Salvation

We believe that Salvation is deliverance from all sin and unrighteousness through the atonement of Jesus Christ. A person receives Salvation by repentance of sin, water baptism in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and receiving the baptism of the Holy Ghost, and the continuance of living a godly life (Acts 2:36-41).


Water Baptism

We believe that water baptism is an essential part of New Testament salvation.  Without the proper mode of baptism it is impossible to enter the kingdom of God (St. John 3:5).  Water Baptism can only be administered by immersion (Mark 1:10; Acts 8:38,39; Romans 6:4; Colossians 2:12).  The name in which baptism is administered is in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ.  The Lord Jesus Christ commissioned his disciples to go into all nations and baptize in the Name (singular) of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost (Matthew 28:19).  The disciples executed this commission on the Day of Pentecost by baptizing converts in the Name (singular) of Jesus Christ.  All case histories of New Testament baptisms were administered in the name of the Lord Jesus (Acts 2:38). Without the Name, water baptism is void.


We believe that the receiving of the baptism of the Holy Ghost, being born of the Spirit, is an essential part of New Testament salvation.  The baptism of the Holy Ghost is evidenced by speaking in other tongues (other languages) as the Spirit of God gives utterance.  If this supernatural manifestation does not take place, one has not received the Holy Ghost 

(Acts 2:1-41; 4:12; 8:5-40; 10:44-48; 19:1-7).

Baptism of the Holy Ghost


Many in the Church world are confused about the difference between the gifts of the Spirit and the gift of the Spirit.  In the Apostle Paul's first letter to the Corinthian church, Paul was not expounding on the subject of the New Birth and being filled with the Holy Ghost, he was expounding on the subject of "spiritual gifts" (I Corinthians 12:1).  To receive the gift of the Holy Ghost is to receive life; to receive the gifts of the Holy Ghost is to receive the functions that demonstrate that this life is within you.

The Gifts of the Spirit vs. The Gift of the Spirit (Holy Ghost)


Those who profess to be Pentecostals believe in Holiness in addition to receiving the Holy Ghost with the initial evidence of speaking in tongues. Those who profess to be Apostolic believe and teach Holiness, having the Pentecostal experience of receiving the Holy Ghost in addition to being baptized in water in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ .There are many who profess Holiness who do not believe in receiving the Holy Ghost with the initial evidence of speaking in tongues nor being baptized in water in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ. There are many who call themselves Pentecostals that do not believe in being baptized in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ, even though they believe in Holiness.  The Apostolic believes in Holiness, the Pentecostal experience of the baptism of the Holy Ghost speaking in tongues as the Spirit gives them utterance, and in the baptism in the Name of Jesus Christ.

Holiness – Pentecostals – Apostolic – What’s the Difference?


We believe in the second coming of Christ; that He shall come from heaven to earth, personally, bodily, visibly (Acts 1:11; Titus 2:11-13; St. Matthew 16:27; 24:30, 25:30; Luke21:27; John 1:14, 17; Titus 2:11) and that the Church, the bride, will be caught up to meet Him in the air. (1Thessalonians, 4:16-17). 

The Second Coming of Christ


The First United Church of Jesus Christ Apostolic believes and practices Divine Healing.  It is a commandment of Jesus Christ to the Apostles (St. Mark 16:18).  Jesus affirms his teachings of healing by explaining to His disciples, who were to be Apostles, that healing the afflicted is by faith (St. Luke 9:40 – 41).  Therefore, we believe that healing by faith in God has a scriptural support and ordained authority.  St. James’ writings in his epistle, encourage Elders to pray for the sick, lay hands upon them and to anoint them with oil, and that prayers with faith shall heal the sick and the Lord shall raise them up. 

Divine Healing


The First United Church of Jesus Christ Apostolic believes that miracles occur to convince men that the Holy Bible is God’s infallible Word.  A miracle can be defined as an extraordinary visible act of the Divine power of Christ, wrought by the efficient agency of the will of God, which has as its final cause the vindication of the righteousness of God’s Word.  We do so believe that the works of God, which have been performed since the beginning of creation, do and will occur today where the name of the Lord is preached, Faith in Jesus Christ is exercised, the Holy Ghost is active, and the Gospel is promulgated in the truth.  (Acts 5:15; 6:8; 9:40; Luke 4:36, 5:5-6, 7:14-15; St. Mark 14:15). 

Miracles


In order for and ordinance to be valid, it must have been instituted by Jesus Christ.  When we speak of ordinances of the church, we are speaking of those instituted by Jesus Christ, in which by sensible signs the grace of God in Christ and the benefits of the covenant of the grace are represented, sealed, and applied to believers, and these in turn give expressions to their faith and allegiance to God.  The First United Church of Jesus Christ recognizes three ordinances as having been instituted by Jesus Christ Himself and therefore, binding upon the church practice. 

  1. The Lord’s Supper (Holy Communion)

The Lords Supper symbolizes the Lord’s death, and suffering for the benefit and in the place of His people.  It also symbolizes the believer’s participation in the crucified Christ.  It represents not only the death of Jesus Christ as the object of faith which unites the believers to Jesus Christ, but also the effect of this act is the giving of life, strength, and joy to the soul.  The communication by faith enters into a special spiritual union of his soul with the Glorified Christ.  

  1. Feet Washing

Feet washing is practiced and recognized as an ordinance in the First United Church because Jesus Christ, by His example, showed that humility characterized greatness in the Kingdom of God, and that service, rendered to others gave evidence that humility, motivated by love, exists.  These services are held subsequent to the Lords Supper; however the regularity is left to the discretion of the Pastor.  

  1. Water Baptism

The First United Church of Jesus Christ Apostolic believes that Water Baptism is necessary as instructed by Jesus Christ in St. John 3:5. “Except a man be born again of water and of spirit.”

However, we do not believe that water baptism alone is a means of salvation, but is an outward demonstration that one has already had a conversion experience and has accepted Jesus Christ as his personal Savior.  As Apostolics, we practice immersion in preference to “sprinkling,” because immersion corresponds more closely to the death, burial and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ (Colossians 2:12) It also symbolizes regeneration and purification more than any other mode. Therefore we practice immersion as our mode of Baptism. 

The Ordinances of the Church